It was about 1836 when the picture above was taken of the Schooner John J. Ward with Capt. Van Cleef as skipper. The terminal...

bermuda-hundred-boat-at-portIt was about 1836 when the picture above was taken of the Schooner John J. Ward with Capt. Van Cleef as skipper. The terminal at Bermuda Hundred was at the end of Bermuda Hundred Road on the James River. You can still see some of pilings left from the days it was a vibrant port. The Farmville & Powhatan (narrow-gage) railroad brought lumber and coal to the terminal to be shipped. Passengers would also travel from the Bermuda Hundred location. Ben A. Ruffin sailed to New York five times on the John J. Ward, according to a note on the picture.


Answer to last week’s recent history question:

Regarding the What’s Up Photo in your Feb 22,2017 edition. The Esso sign is on the north east corner of Rt 10 and Chester Rd. It was Cline’s Home Equipment, where the florist is today.The station on the north east corner,shown in your photo,was originally owned by Mr. Lindsey, but was sold to my father chester-road-west-hundred-road-intersection-1970
in the mid to late 50’s and became Stringfield’s Amoco.The right hand side of the building was Harwell’s Hardware.The station became several things from a sub shop to a loan office after the station closed. Harwell’s became a slot car track and dance studio after they moved to Center Street. When this photo was taken in 1970, I believe Harwell’s had moved and the service station was no longer in business as a service station. The Hines/Sibley’s building was House’s Food Market,run by Nat House and his wife, when my father had the station. The Lindseys lived in the 2 story house at the corner of Rt 10 and Petersbuirg St,within sight of the station.
Thank you for running the photo,
William “Bill” Stringfield