ABOVE: A vehicle passes by on Ware Bottom Spring Road, near where Barney McLaughlin plans to relocate his home construction business and house a stone-cutting... McLaughlin gets rezoning approval for industrial site

ABOVE: A vehicle passes by on Ware Bottom Spring Road, near where Barney McLaughlin plans to relocate his home construction business and house a stone-cutting operation. The buildings would be located on the left behind a 50-foot tree buffer.

It looks as though Barney McLaughlin will be able to relocate his home construction business after all.

The county supervisors unanimously approved McLaughlin’s request to rezone a 2.2-acre property at 1701 Ware Bottom Spring Road from I-1 light industrial to I-3 heavy industrial.

The supervisors’ approval came in spite of the Planning Commission voting to recommend denial of the rezoning request by a 3-1 vote July 17. County staff was also against the proposal.

Claire Shirley, president of Gradient PC engineering, addressed the supervisors July 25. She said McLaughlin wants to use about 1 acre of the property to house his construction company along with some small start-up businesses.

Supervisor Dorothy Jaeckle said she was told that one of the businesses would make granite counters.

The rezoning request includes plans to build two 3,100-square-foot corrugated metal buildings with outside storage areas.

The narrow, triangular-shaped property is bounded by Seaborn Coastland Railroad and Parker Battery National Park to the west, Ware Bottom Spring Road to the north, and Ramblewood Drive to the east. It would be accessed from Ramblewood Drive.

The applicant plans to develop the site using public water and an on-site septic system.

Proffered conditions include a requirement that trees be preserved within a 50-foot setback from Ware Bottom Springs Road. In addition, 12 8-foot-tall evergreens would be planted along Ramblewood Drive and shrubs planted next to the railroad right-of-way to screen the view from the national park.

“Considering the other industrial sites around there, this looks like a step up,” Virginia Somers said during public comment.